Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics

Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics

eLife publishes research that uses techniques including X-ray crystallography, cryo-EM and single-molecule methods. Learn more about what we publish and sign up for the latest research.
Illustration by Davide Bonazzi

Latest articles

    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics

    High-resolution structures of multiple 5-HT3AR-setron complexes reveal a novel mechanism of competitive inhibition

    Sandip Basak et al.
    Cryo-electron microscopic structures of 5-HT3A receptor in complex with first and second generations of clinically used setron reveal the molecular basis for their binding modes and mechanisms of inhibitory action.
    1. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics

    Structural basis of ClpXP recognition and unfolding of ssrA-tagged substrates

    Xue Fei et al.
    Cryo-EM structures of the AAA+ ClpXP protease bound to an ssrA degron reveal the mechanism of substrate recognition and show how the machine transitions from recognition to translocation and unfolding.
    1. Biochemistry and Chemical Biology
    2. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics

    Structural insight into toxin secretion by contact-dependent growth inhibition transporters

    Jeremy Guerin et al.
    Structures of CdiB outer membrane transporters reveal the channel-gating mechanism for the secretion of large bacterial toxins.
    1. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics

    Cannabidiol interactions with voltage-gated sodium channels

    Lily Goodyer Sait et al.
    The high resolution crystal structure and electrophysiology of a sodium channel complex with cannabidiol, a drug approved for treatment of severe epilepsies, demonstrate the basis for its structural- functional effects.
    1. Computational and Systems Biology
    2. Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics

    Investigating the trade-off between folding and function in a multidomain Y-family DNA polymerase

    Xiakun Chu et al.
    The physical interaction network encoded in the multi-domain protein native structure handles the trade-off between the fast, stable folding and the efficient, reliable function.

Senior editors

  1. Richard Aldrich
    Richard Aldrich
    The University of Texas at Austin, United States
  2. Olga Boudker
    Weill Cornell Medicine, United States
  3. Cynthia Wolberger
    Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, United States
  4. See more editors