1. Evolutionary Biology
  2. Genetics and Genomics
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A putative origin of the insect chemosensory receptor superfamily in the last common eukaryotic ancestor

  1. Richard Benton  Is a corresponding author
  2. Christophe Dessimoz
  3. David Moi
  1. University of Lausanne, Switzerland
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Cite this article as: eLife 2020;9:e62507 doi: 10.7554/eLife.62507

Abstract

The insect chemosensory repertoires of Odorant Receptors (ORs) and Gustatory Receptors (GRs) together represent one of the largest families of ligand-gated ion channels. Previous analyses have identified homologous 'Gustatory Receptor-Like (GRL)' proteins across Animalia, but the evolutionary origin of this novel class of ion channels is unknown. We describe a survey of unicellular eukaryotic genomes for GRLs, identifying several candidates in fungi, protists and algae that contain many structural features characteristic of animal GRLs. The existence of these proteins in unicellular eukaryotes, together with ab initio protein structure predictions, provide evidence for homology between GRLs and a family of uncharacterized plant proteins containing the DUF3537 domain. Together, our analyses suggest an origin of this protein superfamily in the last common eukaryotic ancestor.

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Author details

  1. Richard Benton

    Center for Integrative Genomics, Faculty of Biology and Medicine, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland
    For correspondence
    Richard.Benton@unil.ch
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0003-4305-8301
  2. Christophe Dessimoz

    Center for Integrative Genomics, Faculty of Biology and Medicine, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.
    ORCID icon "This ORCID iD identifies the author of this article:" 0000-0002-2170-853X
  3. David Moi

    Center for Integrative Genomics, Faculty of Biology and Medicine, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland
    Competing interests
    The authors declare that no competing interests exist.

Funding

H2020 European Research Council (833548)

  • Richard Benton

FP7 Ideas: European Research Council (615094)

  • Richard Benton

Novartis Stiftung?für?Medizinisch-Biologische Forschung (N/A)

  • Richard Benton

Schweizerischer Nationalfonds zur F?rderung der Wissenschaftlichen Forschung (31003A_166646)

  • Richard Benton

Schweizerischer Nationalfonds zur F?rderung der Wissenschaftlichen Forschung (183723)

  • Christophe Dessimoz
  • David Moi

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and interpretation, or the decision to submit the work for publication.

Reviewing Editor

  1. Claude Desplan, New York University, United States

Publication history

  1. Received: August 26, 2020
  2. Accepted: December 3, 2020
  3. Accepted Manuscript published: December 4, 2020 (version 1)

Copyright

? 2020, Benton et al.

This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License permitting unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.

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